Mother’s Day Story

A Twist of Motherly Love

by Hana Lee (Staff Writers)

            “I hate you! Just leave me alone!”

I stormed up the stairs and slammed my bedroom door. I buried my face in a pillow and started crying. Nothing was normal ever since my mom went exploring in the woods and never came back, as I predicted. Dad and I waited for her to come back, but she never did. Two years ago, he met a woman and he instantly fell in love with her. I felt like Dad was betraying Mom, and I fought back, but nothing could stop him. We never really talked to each other ever since then and my stepmom, Jezabelle, isn’t as thoughtful as I hoped she would be. Today is Mother’s Day and I’m not really enjoying it.

“Amber? Can I talk to you for a second?” my stepmom asked. She sounded really nice, but she was just deceiving me.

“Go away!” I yelled.

Hearing her voice felt like someone had stabbed me in the heart, so I started crying again. I looked out the window and I saw a girl and her mom walking down the street laughing together. They wore matching hats and seemed so happy, unlike me.

“Ugh!”

It made me feel so jealous that I threw a vase at the door, not even caring about the damage. Dad came in my room, and I turned away. He was shocked at the broken vase.

“Why did you break this? Jezabelle made it for me on our eighth anniversary!”

“You don’t even care about my pain? Just get out. I thought you were my dad.”

“Honey, no. It’s not that. It’s just…mom. Don’t you remember?” he asked with a look on his face that made me even more depressed.

“No, I was five.”

“She left on Mother’s Day. Said she would come right back, but never did,” he explained. This just made me even more depressed, so I excused myself to get some fresh air. I just felt like this was the right thing to do, so I opened the door. The freedom I was enjoying felt like I was the happiest person in the world, but I wasn’t. The depression came over me again so I walked to through the streets soberly. ‘If I just bond with Jezabelle, maybe I’ll feel better and not regret myself for letting Mom go.’ The idea wasn’t perfect, though. I never would, and I never will. We have nothing in common. I kept staggering as I walked down the street, without .

HONK!

“Wha…?” I turned my head, to see a silver Mercedes coming right at me. I was petrified. I couldn’t move. I had never experienced this kind of trauma. The car slammed right into me and all the daylights went out of me just before I saw a middle aged woman help carry me into an ambulance.

 

 

I opened my eyes and I saw my dad’s face.

“Where am I, Dad?” I asked, with a bit of confusion.

“You’re at the hospital. You got hit by a car.”

“Wha…?”

It felt like a piece of me was missing. Then I remembered the woman that helped me after the car crash.

“Dad, I have to go!” I leaped out of the bed and rushed out.

“Wait! You’re not fully recovered!”

Right when he said that, I stumbled and fell. The same woman came up to me.

“Are you ok?”

I looked up and I saw her. She had firm gray eyes like me and I felt like I had seen her smile before, but where? My mind was going crazy. She helped me up and escorted me to my room. Dad was surprised.

“You scared the heck out of me, kiddo,” he gave me a pat on the head and helped get me into the bed. The woman smiled and waved at me.

“Goodbye, stay safe!” She opened the door, but I called for her.

“Wait!”

She turned around and I asked what her name was. “Heather Graystone. If you need me, I live on Grace Avenue.” She left the room and I looked at Dad. He was still. “Dad, Dad?”

“Huh?” he had a strange look on his face, so nerve racking it started to scare me. “What’s wrong?” After I asked this, he snapped out of his trance.

“Oh, nothing…,” but I knew something was up. The doctor came in and said I could go, so my dad helped me get in the car. It was quiet on the way home so it was a bit awkward. Dad had a look on his face that made me worried. When we got home, Dad went up to his room and started to talk to Jezabelle. I eavesdropped and I heard a bit of what they were saying.

“I met her…,” my dad said

“And I hope you aren’t going to turn on me, right?”
“Um… I don’t know. You weren’t my first choice.”

“Ugh!,” Jezabelle stormed towards the door and I quickly hid. She passed me and Dad yelled for her to come back. He was a bit depressed and left. Because of my stupid accident, my family was torn apart.  I went out and headed towards Grace Avenue, to see if she was actually my mom. I knocked on the door and she opened it.

“Hi!”

She welcomed me in and she headed towards the kitchen. I looked around at her photos and I saw a picture of…me? I wanted to find out if this was true, so I decided to subtly question her.

“Did you have a family before?” She had a worried look on her face, but then relaxed it.

“I did, and you look so much like my daughter, but…I…just don’t want to talk about it…,” She turned around and excused herself. Something told me that this was true and I was her daughter. She came back and I asked her a ‘not so subtle’ question.

“Hey MOM, how have you been doing? Anything new?” ‘Mom’ gasped and started to hug me.

“I missed you so much Amber!” We laughed and cried and weeped and sang for joy, but one thing was still nagging me in the back of my head.

“Why did you leave us and then tried to come back?”

“We had financial issues I guess…” I told her I had to go so we hugged and I left. Before I opened the door, Jezabelle stormed out with a suitcase and drove off in her car. Dad screamed, “Wait!”, but it was a bit too late. She left. I jumped up and down and started to celebrate. Dad gave me ‘The Look’ and I went in. Dad sat on the table and sighed.

“Dad, guess what?”

“Don’t depress me even more.”

“I found Mom.”

“So you found out huh?” This was the only happy moment in his day. He started to hug me, and I guess this was a perfect time for a family meeting. We called mom over and she got here in no time flat. We had a family meeting, and it was actually working out! Our issues were flattened out and I guess we turned out to be a happy family after all.

This entry was posted in Creative Writing. Bookmark the permalink.